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first_imgA CREDITORS meeting has been called for early next month for a leading Donegal building supply company.The meeting concerns Carrick Providers Limited, of Teelin Road, Bogagh, Carrick.The creditors meeting will take place at Gallagher’s Hotel in Letterkenny at 9am on Monday, March 7th. In a separate development local estate agent Paul Reynolds of Property Partners is currently offering the premises once occupied by the company for sale (pictured).The site is described as follows: “Commercial premises with development potential (formerly carrick providers ltd) property being sold with adjoining yard and further yard on opposite side of road with direct access to glen river total area c.1. 3 acres may be sold as one lot or subdivided.”No price has been advertised.CREDITORS MEETING CALLED FOR DONEGAL BUILDING SUPPLY COMPANY was last modified: February 24th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_imgMay 10 2018Over 65s say they would find technology to help them take their medications helpful, but need the technology to be familiar, accessible and easy to use, according to research by Queen Mary University of London and University of Cambridge. People who do not use smartphones said that they’d prefer to have smartwatches than smartphones for reminders to take their pills.Around one tenth of cardiovascular events are associated with poor medication adherence, but some patients could be helped through new technologies to aid them with tablet taking and monitor adherence.Some technologies include apps that allow patients to receive counseling about medications and reminders to improve and monitor tablet taking. There are also interactive text message reminders for tablet taking. And Ingestible sensor systems (ISSs) are a combination of wearable and ingestible sensors working in conjunction with smartphones, PCs and tablets to detect ingested medication.However, not much is known on whether over 65s might find it difficult to adopt these technologies, due to ethnic diversity, and age-related physical and mental impairments.The study, published in the Journal of International Medical Research, investigated opinions about available technologies in a focus group of patients aged over 65 taking cardiovascular medications.The over 65s in the study generally valued the opportunity to receive alerts to help with practical aspects of medicine taking, like forgetting and monitoring treatment: “I think it’s good because there’s some people who as time goes by lose certain of their faculties as time goes by, and memory beginning to fade and so on, so on, it could have been a short retention in memory can cause you to miss a [medicine]” “. . .you always need to remember these things, they do slip your mind, even if there’s days of the week printed on your tablets sometimes you think, “did I take it this morning?” “I mean it’s a similar thing with now that hospitals, they text you to remind you about your hospital appointment now.” People familiar with smartphones welcomed an intervention through smartphones. Some participants were not familiar with smartphones, but all used wristwatches and preferred interventions using this technology, such as smartwatches: “. . .watches, if we all had watches. . .If it’s simpler to use elderly would appreciate more, it’s something that they have on their hand, on their arm. . . It’s a continuation of what we’re familiar with instead of something that we’re not familiar.” “Everybody’s been used to wearing at some time or another is a watch. . .So I think that most of us would find this much better.” “The watch is good but the mobile phone, half the time old people don’t know where they’ve put the phone, it’s the same with glasses, they don’t know where they’ve put them so it wouldn’t be of no benefit, but that watch would.” “. . .a smartphone, well, I did have but I put it in the washing machine, I dropped it.” Related StoriesMarijuana isn’t a great choice for glaucoma treatment, says expertGut-boosting food may put an end to childhood malnutrition worldwideDon’t ignore diastolic blood pressure values, say researchersOther concerns included potential reduction in face-to-face communication, data security, becoming dependent on technology and worrying about the consequences of technological failures: “If they’re not going to remember to take their tablets they ain’t going to remember to charge their mobiles.” “If it’s got to be a smart phone rather than an ordinary phone the cost of providing these for all the elderly is going to be astronomical.” “Well I see [technology might cause] lack of communication between professionals and the very elderly. . .., I’m afraid that this is about cost-cutting.” “I remember there was, the National Health Service right, had invested billions into this high tech computer that was going to be doing all singing all dancing, and guess what, it never did work, so all the investment that they put into this main frame that would then take all the information, it had gone done, it had a bug, it had glitches and it never performed as fit for purpose, so I’m one of these guys who’s lost confidence in technology.” “Technology is useful but you can’t depend on it, you never can depend on it.”center_img Lead researcher Dr Anna De Simoni from Queen Mary University of London said: “These findings have highlighted that people over 65 on cardiovascular medications are willing to consider technology to help with practical aspects of their day-to-day medicine taking, such as getting reminder alerts and monitoring doses taken, either themselves or by carers and clinicians.”In clinical consultations about medicine taking, healthcare professionals can explore technologies familiar and easily accessible to patients as a way to ensure good adherence. To this end additionally checking on common concerns, like worries about data security, becoming dependent on technology and consequences of technological failures can be beneficial.” Source:https://www.qmul.ac.uk/last_img read more

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first_img Source:https://www.fau.eu/2018/07/11/news/research/fau-researchers-identify-parkinsons-disease-as-a-possible-autoimmune-disease/ Jul 19 2018Parkinson’s disease, formerly also referred to as shaking palsy, is one of the most frequent disorders affecting movement and the nervous system. Medical researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have come across a possible cause of the disease – in the patients’ immune system.Currently, approximately 4.1 million people suffer from Parkinson’s disease throughout the globe, in Germany alone more than 300,000 people are affected. Typical symptoms of the disease are slowness of movement, rigidity, frequent shaking and an increasingly stooped posture. The cause is the continuous death of nerve cells in the brain, which produce the messenger substance dopamine.Scientists are working to gain insights into the mechanisms which lead to the loss of nerve cells that produce dopamine. Until now, little has been known about whether human immune cells have an important role to play in Parkinson’s disease. The stem cell researchers Dr. Annika Sommer, Dr. Iryna Prots and Prof. Dr. Beate Winner from FAU and their team have made a major leap forward in research into this aspect of the disease. The scientists from Erlangen were able to prove that in Parkinson’s disease immune cells from the immune system, so-called t-cells, attack and kill nerve cells which produce dopamine in the midbrain.The FAU team based its research on a surprising observation: the scientists found an unusually high number of t-cells in the midbrain of Parkinson’s patients. These cells are commonly found in the brains of patients suffering from diseases in which the immune system attacks the brain. During tests carried out in collaboration with the movement disorders clinic (molecular neurology) at Universitätsklinikum Erlangen (Prof. Jürgen Winkler), researchers discovered an increased number of certain t-cells, specifically Th17 cells, in Parkinson’s patients, similar to patients with autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.Related StoriesPatients with bipolar disorder are seven times more likely to develop Parkinson’sGut infection can lead to a pathology resembling Parkinson’s diseaseStudy unravels how cancer medication works in brains of Parkinson’s patientsIn view of these results, the researchers decided to develop a very unusual cell culture from human cells. A small skin sample was taken from affected patients and healthy test subjects. These skin cells were converted into stem cells, which can develop into any type of cell. The research team then further differentiated these cells into midbrain nerve cells specific to the patient. These midbrain nerve cells were then brought into contact with fresh t-cells from the same patients. The result: the immune cells of Parkinson’s patients killed a large number of their nerve cells, but this did not appear to be the case with healthy test subjects. Another result gives reason for hope: antibodies which block the effect of Th17 cells, including one antibody which is already being used on a daily basis in the hospital to treat psoriasis, were able to largely prevent the death of the nerve cells.’Thanks to our investigations, we were able to clearly prove not only that t-cells are involved in causing Parkinson’s disease, but also what role they actually play,’ explains Prof. Dr. Beate Winner. ‘The findings from our study offer a significant basis for new methods of treating Parkinson’s disease.’last_img read more

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