Vermont’s Dealer.com recognized on the 2009 Inc. 5000

first_imgSource: Dealer.com Burlington, VT, August 24, 2009 — Inc. magazine today recognized Dealer.com of Burlington, Vermont, with a rank of 88 among the top 100 fastest growing private advertising and marketing companies. Dealer.com, the global leader in online marketing solutions for the automotive industry, experienced a three year sales growth of 307.2% between 2005 and 2008. Overall, Dealer.com was ranked number 996 on the third annual Inc. 5000, an exclusive ranking of the nation’s fastest-growing private companies. 2009 marks the third consecutive year that Dealer.com has been recognized in the ranking. The Inc. 5000 list represents the most comprehensive look at the most important segment of the economy—America’s independent-minded entrepreneurs.“Savvy trend spotters and those who invest in private companies know that the Inc. 5000 is the best place to find out about young companies that are achieving success through a wide variety of unprecedented business models, as well as older private companies that are still expanding at an impressive rate,” said Inc. 5000 project manager Jim Melloan. “That’s why our list is so eagerly anticipated every year.”Commenting on the ranking, Mark Bonfigli, Dealer.com CEO, stated: “Our employees are the heart of our business and they are responsible for our growth and this top ranking– for the third consecutive year. I am excited about our ranking and give credit to the entire Dealer.com team. Their talent and dedication to our clients’ success is what drives our business and our continued growth. In fact, we are currently on track to have our most successful year ever in 2009.”MethodologyThe Inc. 5000 is ranked according to percentage revenue growth from 2005 through 2008. To qualify, companies must have been founded and generating revenue by the first week of 2005, and therefore able to show four full calendar years of sales. Additionally, they have to be U.S.-based, privately held, for profit, and independent — not subsidiaries or divisions of other companies — as of December 31, 2008. Revenue in 2005 must have been at least $200,000, and revenue in 2008 must have been at least $2 million. The top 10 percent of companies on the list comprise the Inc. 500, now in its 28th year.About Inc. MagazineFounded in 1979 and acquired in 2005 by Mansueto Ventures LLC, Inc. (www.inc.com(link is external)) is the only major business magazine dedicated exclusively to owners and managers of growing private companies that delivers real solutions for today’s innovative company builders. With a total paid circulation of 712,961, Inc. provides hands-on tools and market-tested strategies for managing people, finances, sales, marketing, and technology. Visit us online at Inc.com.About Dealer.com (www.dealer.com(link is external))Dealer.com is the global leader in online marketing solutions for the automotive industry, providing award winning e-marketing solutions to OEMs, auto dealers and media companies. More of the nation’s top auto groups use Dealer.com for their local online marketing than any other provider. Recent national and international accolades include: the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year, top ranking in the Net Promoter® Score Survey of customer satisfaction, Deloitte’s Technology Fast 500 and the Web Marketing Association’s Automobile Standard of Excellence.   In addition, Dealer.com was the 2008 top rated web provider on leading online rating websites, as well as the Gold Award winner from the Dealers’ choice awards for best dealer website solutions.last_img read more

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Howard Dean, American in Paris, talks election results

first_imgBy James Dwinell. Howard Dean, former governor of Vermont and former chair of the Democrat National Committee traveled to Paris earlier this week to share his conclusions on the 2010 mid-term elections. Billed as Vermont’s six-term governor, Dean followed Ms Anita Dunn, former White House communications director.Dean said, in part, ‘The data from these mid-term elections is interesting. There were fewer voters: fewer young people than in 2008, fewer people of color than in 2008, and consequently more white people. In exit polls, had this group of voters been the voters in 2008, their vote for president would have been evenly split between Senator McCain and President Obama. Another significant bit of information, forty-five of the newly elected Republican representatives were elected in districts which McCain won in 2008. The districts were really never Democratic districts. And most surprising, sixty-five percent of the voters would have voted to throw out all 535 representatives and senators if allowed to do so. Though an interesting election, do not think that this was a watershed election.‘This margin of victory for Republicans will not hold. In 2008 for the first time in modern electoral history, more people 18-35 year old voted than senior citizens. Obama, though not of this generation, is the first president of this generation. There is more difference than commonality in this group. The ideological ‘bandwidth’ is narrow. And lastly, though people in my generation worked for civil rights, we did not live with people of color, people of different sexual orientation, and people from different nationalities. The 18-35 demographic live in this diverse world and they date each other!!‘The tea party phenomenon was about saying that ordinary people matter.  I like that. Part of the tea party unease is that the ‘diverse’ Obama is in charge. This makes them uncomfortable. Part of the GOP anger is anti-immigrant and anti-gay. The tea party, being well out of the growing youth vote age range, will not be able to be as influential in the future.‘In 2012, the 18-35 age voting group will be the 18-39 year old group; in 2016 it will be the 18-43 year old group. As such, they, though with their diverse lifestyle, will be the largest voting block and will determine our leaders in the near future.‘Even with the energy of the tea party and the dozens of new GOP congressional seats, they will not attack the deficit which I think is a more serious problem than terrorism. We simply do not have the political will to attack it. We will not raise taxes; we will not cut the entitlements.’James Dwinell lives in Norwich. He attended the International Association of Political Consultants in Paris at which Dean was a featured speaker.last_img read more

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Shumlin, Comcast to unveil plan to connect low-income Vermonters to the Internet on Thursday

first_imgComcast Cable,Comcast and Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin will host a press conference to kick off the Internet Essentials Program in Vermont, a new initiative that helps connect low-Income families with children who are eligible for a free lunch under the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) to the Internet. The goal of Internet Essentials is to help get more American families online and help close the digital divide.   WHO:          Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin – CONFIRMED                       Vermont Senate President Pro Tempore John Campbell (invited)                       Vermont Speaker of the House Shap Smith (invited)                       City of Winooski Mayor Michael O’Brien – CONFIRMED                       City of Winooski Superintendent of Schools Mary Martineau – CONFIRMED                      Mary Alice McKenzie, Executive Director of the Boys & Girls Club of Burlington – CONFIRMEDMark Reilly, Senior Vice President of Government and Regulatory Affairs, Comcast  Northeast Division – CONFIRMED WHEN:          Thursday, September 15 at Noon (*Speaking program begins at 12:15 PM)                       WHERE:         O’Brien Community Center 32 Malletts Bay Avenue, Winooski, VT 05404 BACKGROUND:While America has increasingly become a digital nation, many low-income families are left at a great disadvantage because they don’t have Internet service at home. Internet Essentials has been designed to address this problem and help make broadband adoption a reality for more families. It addresses all three of the main barriers to broadband adoption that research has identified: 1) a lack of understanding of how the Internet is relevant and useful; 2) the cost of a home computer and, 3) the cost of Internet service. Comcast is asking for help from parents, educators, community leaders and other government officials to join in this effort, spread the word and help increase broadband adoption across Vermont.last_img read more

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