Monthly Archives: July 2019

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first_imgA disabled peer has accused the renowned fertility expert Lord Winston of trying to hijack his attempts to outlaw disability discrimination in abortion laws because of his “discriminatory eugenic agenda”.The exchange in the House of Lords on Friday came as peers were debating Lord [Kevin] Shinkwin’s abortion (disability equality) bill, which he says would bring abortion legislation into line with the Equality Act.The disabled Tory peer’s private member’s bill, which has reached the report stage, would make it illegal to carry out an abortion on the grounds of disability on a fetus that was more than 24 weeks old, unless there was a risk of serious, permanent damage to the mother or her life was at risk.At present, Lord Shinkwin (pictured during the debate) reminded fellow peers, a fetus can be aborted right up to the moment of birth, if it has a significant impairment or, as the Abortion Act 1967 describes it, “there is a substantial risk that if the child were born it would suffer from such physical or mental abnormalities as to be seriously handicapped”.At a previous stage of the bill, he told fellow peers that “were a younger, unborn version of me to be detected in the womb today [the Abortion Act] and the [Department of Health’s] search-and-destroy approach to screening would make me a prime candidate for abortion”. He said on Friday that his “disability rights bill” would bring the law on disability discrimination before birth into line with laws that address disability discrimination after birth.But Lord [Robert] Winston, the fertility expert and television presenter – who has carried out pioneering work on allowing embryos to be screened for genetic diseases before being used for in vitro fertilisation – tabled an amendment that would exclude pregnancies where there was “a high probability that the fetus will die at, during, or shortly after delivery due to serious fetal anomaly”.The Labour peer, who later withdrew his amendment, said: “Whether we like it or not, whatever our religious position might be, the fact is that we accept termination of pregnancy and I believe that most people in our society have the normative consideration that it is reasonable, in cases where a fetus is severely damaged and unlikely to survive or is going to be extremely ill and in great pain, to terminate that pregnancy.”But Lord Shinkwin said that Lord Winston’s amendment was “cynical” and “reinforces discrimination because it singles out even more acutely a particular group for destruction on grounds of disability”.He said that defining “fatal or life-limiting involves a degree of subjective judgment which is influenced by understandings and by the availability of technology, both of which can change with time”. Lord Shinkwin also criticised the British Pregnancy Advisory Service, the Family Planning Association, and Antenatal Results and Choices – previously known as Support Around Termination For Abnormality – which had organised a meeting about his bill in the Lords, but failed to invite him.He said the organisations had “insinuated and implicitly claimed” in their invitation to the meeting that the 230 disabled babies aborted after 24 weeks in 2015 had all been diagnosed with severe or fatal fetal abnormalities, when they could not possibly have known that because the Department of Health does not hold that information.He had previously told fellow peers that there had been a 56 per cent increase in the number of terminations on grounds of disability after 24 weeks between 2010 and 2015, and a 68 per cent increase in the total number of terminations on the grounds of disability, with 3,213 in 2015.He pointed out on Friday that, of the fetuses “aborted for the crime of having Down’s syndrome, for example, two were aborted at 25 weeks, one at 26 weeks, one at 28, one at 30, another at 31, three at 32 weeks, two at 33, two at 34 – and one at 39 weeks”.Lord Shinkwin said the three organisations had an “overtly discriminatory agenda”, which he said also informed Lord Winston’s amendment and his “complete failure even to make contact with me”.He said the amendment was “completely inappropriate and incompatible with the progress achieved on disability rights”, and he accused Lord Winston of “crass insensitivity” for “hijacking” the disability equality bill of a disabled peer “in order to advance a blatantly discriminatory eugenic agenda”.Lord Shinkwin said the message of his opponents was “stark and bleak”, and was: “Let’s ignore the fact that these disabled babies are human beings, with an equal right to exist.“Let’s reclassify them and call them fetal anomalies. Let’s go one better and call them serious fetal anomalies.”He added: “Well this fetal anomaly, this proud member of your Lordships’ house, is ​having none of it.“I utterly reject this medical mindset that clings to the idea that a disabled baby is a medical failure to be eradicated through abortion. I beg no one for my equality.“I know I have as much right as anyone to be alive.”Lord Winston denied that his amendment was “cynical” and insisted that it was “compassionate”.He said: “Perhaps unlike the noble Lord who has promoted this bill, I have been in constant contact with pregnant women who have had to go through these difficult decisions throughout their pregnancy throughout my professional life.”He said that many women did not attend an antenatal clinic until after 24 weeks into their pregnancy.He added: “I do not feel prepared to have the finger pointed at me saying that I am not trying to do my best, in a small way, for a society where disabilities occur.”last_img read more

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first_imgTaqueria Guadelajara, also on 24th Street, said it was closing “in support of our immigrant families and friends desire and right to protest the evolving state of immigration policies in our country.”It is unclear if these stores will also heed the call for a nationwide general strike on Friday to protest the Trump Administration.The highest concentration of closed stores was up and down 24th Street, where shops as different as Mission Skate Shop and Papalote kept the lights off. Closings on Mission Street were spottier – although significant. One reader said that she “took a quick swing down Mission from 22nd to 26th and found more than 35 businesses closed.” Along trendy Valencia Street most places remained open, but some made clear their support for employees who opted to stay home and others offered to turnover their profits for the day to organizations that helped immigrants.BiRite. Screenshot via Instagram.Evil Eye. Screenshot via Instagram.Emmy’s Spaghetti Shack. Screenshot via Instagram.City officials highlighted the importance of immigrants to the local economy, noting that foreign-born residents generate $210 billion of economic activity in the Bay Area and $60 billion in San Francisco where 35 percent of the residents are immigrants.Latinos comprise 38 percent of the Mission District’s population, down from more than 50 percent in 2000, but still representing the city’s highest concentration of Latinos.For various reasons, many of the stores, restaurants and fruit markets that depend on immigrant labor remained open including cafes, several bakeries and many the fruit markets on the northern end of Mission Street and the fast-food chains McDonald’s and Pollo Campero on Mission Street. A reader reported that the “huge market next to El Farolito, as well as El Farolito bar and taqueria, were closed.” Also closed, she wrote in an email, was the fruit market next to Mission Pie, the fruit market at 26th and Mission, and Casa Maria on Capp and 23rd.At Pollo Campero, Keiry Caceras, the manager of the fried chicken store said, “We’re open because all the Pollo Camperos are open.”At the Evergreen Market on Mission Street two of the workers, like those in other open stores, said they were unaware of the protest. Nearby at Mi Ranchita, a worker, Leo, said they closed their Sunnyvale store, but after learning that other markets on Mission Street planned to be open, they opted to do the same.Some of the fruit markets on Mission Street remained open. Photo by Lydia Chávez Tags: immigrants • immigration Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% 0%center_img While most stores in the Mission District remained open Thursday, dozens made it clear on handmade signs taped to shuttered storefronts that they were willing to forgo profits for a day to show support for the immigrant community.The closings were part of a nationwide protest, A Day Without Immigrants, meant to underscore the importance of the country’s more than 40 million foreign-born residents who represent more than 13 percent of the population.Many of the signs in the Mission District also stressed the owner’s identification with immigrants. La Palma Mexicatessen, the successful tortilla maker on the corner of 24th and Florida streets, wrote that their closure was a “demonstration of the importance of us (immigrants) in this country.” And Miguel and Victor Escobedo, the owners of Papalote Mexican Grill,  displayed a family photo on their front window that reflected the generational identity with immigration – ties that bind many San Franciscans.At Papalote Mexican Grill. Photo by Lydia Chávezlast_img read more

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first_imgSAINTS will be aiming to secure their first league win at Hull KR for nine seasons when the sides meet this Friday.Keiron Cunningham came off the bench and scored a try in a 40-0 win back in June 2007 – the last time two points were secured in East Hull.A cup win followed in 2008, as did a draw in 2012, but it’s fair to say Saints’ record on the Robins’ turf isn’t the best.“It is something you can look at but it is, and has to be, a fresh slate every time you go,” he said. “Our challenge as a team and a club is to be ready for every game regardless of whatever the team you are facing is doing. We have to focus on our own performance.“Hull KR weren’t too good against Warrington but were unlucky to lose against Wakefield. They threw a lot at them.“The Roosters game gave us a shot in the arm because we physically matched it with one of the best packs in the world. I saw a twinkle in the eye of the forwards here because it showed they are as good as we think they are. Now we have to get the rest right.“If we take that physicality into the game then we won’t be far off, but we have to be more clinical with the ball.”Saints have a few bumps and bruises heading into the clash – but have time on their side according to Cunningham.Alex Walmsley suffered a clash of heads and will be monitored through the week whilst Roby, Lomax and McDonnell are continuing to improve.“Robes is coming close to the point where we will have to have a shot with him and see how he goes in training,” Keiron said. “But he is a player who will feature heavily in what we do as a club going forward. We all want him back but for the sake of a week or two it would be foolish to try and push him too soon.“He is a super athlete and one of the best players ever to pull on a Saints shirt but he has to right before returning.“Jonny is a candidate for March whilst Shannon is not far off at all. He will be back soon enough and is training with us. We have to get some metres in his legs first and then he will be good to go.“I am confident this is the best squad we have had for a long period of time. It has strength in depth. In the past if we had lost James Roby then we couldn’t bring anything in. It was the same if we had lost a six. We can do that now. We can use Travis Burns at 9 and young Theo Fages is waiting for his chance. Then you have Morgan Knowles too. They will all contribute largely to what we hope will be a successful season.“We haven’t just got a top end and scraping around for kids, there is good quality throughout.“Theo just has to bide his time. It is all about education for him at the moment. He is the future of the club; a young half back who has a massive future ahead of him and he will be at Saints for a long period of time. At the minute he is learning and when he gets the chance he will take it with open arms.“That is the same for Jack Owens. One position we were light in last year was full back. We needed about 18 last season and he has filled in grandly. It he wasn’t here then we would be scraping the barrel. He is only a baby and will be a gem for us going forward.“He might look a little out of sorts at times but we are educating him every week. Now our job is to make him into the mature professional we know he is going to be.“In the end we have to try and pick the best possible team for the job. Hopefully, we can get some stability and roll forward.”A lot of pundits have had their say following the World Club Series and the three defeats suffered by English sides.Saints fared better in terms of the scoreline than Leeds or Wigan, but that is no consolation to Cunningham.“Obviously I would have liked it to have gone better on Friday,” he said. “Long term it won’t affect us but it would have been a nice nut to crack. Physically we got it right but the difference against the Aussies is you need to get all aspects right.“The difference is Salary Cap, pool of players and quality. The cap will be twice or three times bigger than ours when it is updated soon. The pool of players they can draw from is larger too and as a result the quality is better. They can attract the best players from all over the world and are even looking at our top players.“That said, I think the concept of the series is brilliant. As a sport if you look at where our headline games are, it isn’t at international level. The game is built on club rugby.“If you look at when we played Brisbane all those years back, salary cap wise both leagues weren’t that far apart. If we could have had this concept back then it could have worked better.“It seems like it is hurting us now but I do like the spectacle. Club rugby is our bread and butter, and the concept is right but perhaps it is 10-15 years too late. We can build on it though.“We are working hard as a club as is Blake Solly and his team at the RFL.”Tickets for the games against Castleford, Wakefield and Wigan are now on sale – as are ‘specs’ for our trip to Hull KR on Friday.You can buy from the Ticket Office at Langtree Park, by calling 01744 455 052 or online here.last_img read more

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first_imgIt is sad to report the passing of Austin Rhodes at the age of 81, after a long period of ill-health. Anyone who saw him play rugby will tell you that he was real good ‘un. He was virtually the complete player and his wide range of skills meant that he could cover several different positions on the field. In this respect he would have been a prized asset in Super League. Although several of his major triumphs were when he played at full-back, he was still very much a stand-off or scrum-half at heart. He received plaudits from team-mates and opponents alike. Wigan’s star winger Billy Boston was a big fan: “he was like Sam Tomkins in that he had this uncanny ability to step off both feet…I could never do that!”Yet rugby League in the mid-1950s was certainly a tough affair, with skilful practitioners like Austin a target for some harsh treatment from defenders, but he could look after himself too. “Austin always gave me the sort of ball that I could use effectively,” remembers Bev Risman, his stand-off when he joined Leigh. “Apart from being an intelligent footballer, he was never short of knocking people about once or twice either.”Born in Thatto Heath and the son of a collier from a devout Catholic family, Austin attended the local St Austins school, whose Headmaster, Gerry Landers, was famous for developing schoolboy rugby league talent in the early 1950s. He played with great success for his school, town and county – captained them all, in fact – and came to the notice of St Helens RFC after leading St Helens schoolboys to victory in the Lancashire Cup final. His half-back partner was a younger lad called Alex Murphy!Austin signed for the Saints for £100 and at stand-off, made his senior debut against Liverpool City, on 28th March 1955, when Peter Metcalfe was injured. The following season saw him a regular at scrum-half, with another string to his bow, as he volunteered to take over place-kicking duties after Metcalfe’s injury prompted his retirement. He had been a good football player too, an inside right representing the town with the likes of John Connelly, who played for England in the 1966 World Cup. Saints’ fans will remember his typical ‘golfers’ approach to goal kicking with his head well over the ball. He became an excellent marksman, leading the goal-kicking charts with Wakefield’s Neil Fox in 1959-60 [both with 171] and outright in 1960-61, with 145. He also led the points’ scorers that same season, with 338. Fans keeping the score in their match day programmes from the period would invariably put a plethora of ‘G’s next to his name!The 1955-56 campaign ended gloriously for the team, winning the Challenge Cup for the first time against Halifax at Wembley, on 56th April. Although barely out of his teens, Austin made his mark with a brilliant long-distance conversion of Steve Llewellyn’s try that gave the Saints a commanding 10-0 lead at a vital stage of the match.Rhodes ended his first full season with 141 goals and 10 tries in 39 appearances and gained a reputation as a prodigious points scorer. International recognition quickly followed with selection for the 1957 World Cup squad Down Under, but this also led to a major problem that was to stay with him throughout his football career and continued to have an impact for the rest of his life. Thinking he needed to increase his strength to face the Australians and Kiwis, he damaged his back whilst doing extra weight-training. His appending disk problem meant special attention from Coach Jim Sullivan, as Austin recalled years later: “Sully had to strap my back up a certain way before every match. He had to stick layers of plaster across my lower back that eventually would prevent the disk from bulging any further.”Although he made his international debut for Great Britain in the competition, against New Zealand, Austin faced the prospect of National Service. He joined the RAF, where he travelled extensively as a member of the RAF rugby union team and eventually got a posting to the base at Haydock just outside his home town. He had continued to play for the Saints whenever military commitments would allow. By the end of the 1958-59 season, however, Rhodes was converted to full back after an injury to Glyn Moses and further honours followed with a Championship Winner’s medal in the magnificent Championship final against Hunslet, at Odsal. Rhodes kicked 10 goals in Saints’ 44-22 victory and witnessed the greatest try he had ever seen, by Tom van Vollenhoven, when the team faced a 4-12 deficit.Lancashire League and Cup success followed in 1960 and another Challenge Cup Winner’s Medal against the ‘Old Enemy’ Wigan, on 13th May 1961. Once again, his kicking at Wembley was instrumental in stretching Saints winning margin. He punched over two marvellous penalties, one from the half-way line to break the hearts of the Wiganers in the 95,000 crowd in Saints’ 12-6 success. Rhodes had developed into a fine attacking full-back and was a playing member of the Great Britain World Cup Squad in 1960, that went on to win the trophy, together with his team-mates Alex Murphy, Dick Huddart and Vince Karalius. Austin won the last of his four caps against the Kiwis in 1961. He also played for Lancashire on two occasions.At the end of the 1961/62, after another Lancashire Cup final victory, it was time to move on and Austin went to Leigh with team-mate Ken Large. He enjoyed three seasons at Hilton Park and formed a fine partnership in the halves with Bev Risman, making over 80 appearances. Leigh reached the 1963 Lancashire Cup final at Swinton, where they were beaten by the Saints! A transfer to Swinton followed and it was here that he rediscovered his zest for the game, with the likes of Ken Gowers, John Stopford and Graham Williams. Austin’s handling skills really came to the fore as Swinton became a most competitive team, finished runner’s up to St Helens in the Northern Rugby League in 1965-66.Before the Challenge Cup deadline in 1968, Austin re-joined St Helens, for a £1,250 fee, together with his Swinton team-mate Graham Rees. Former Swinton coach Cliff Evans also replaced Joe Coan at Knowsley Road, who rated Austin highly. He may not have been as quick as in the early days, but his experience was there for all to see and he picked up another Lancashire Cup Winners Medal – his third in all – as St. Helens beat Oldham 30-2 in 1968/69. The team also won the Lancashire League title, but persistent injury problems forced Austin to retire at the end of the campaign. His last game was against Doncaster, on 19th April 1969 at Knowsley Road. Overall he had made 229 appearances in his two spells at Knowsley Road, scoring 90 tries and booting over 800 goals with his usual precision style, a total of 1870 points.Austin later returned to Swinton as Coach for a spell from June 1974 to November 1975, gaining them promotion into the First Division and in a local context, coached amateur giants Pilkington Recs. Who could ever forget the two Challenge Cup ties against Wigan and Castleford, both at Knowsley Road, when the Recs so nearly pulled off sensational victories against the Big Boys!A member of the Saints’ Past Players Hall of Fame, he remains one of the best and most popular local footballers the town has ever produced. Austin loved most sports – rugby league, football, boxing, snooker, crown green bowls and remained close friends with his former team-mates Wilf Smith, Brian McGinn and Tom van Vollenhoven throughout his life. He was one of the most knowledgeable and intuitive people to talk rugby league with and always reckoned that, apart from Tom van Vollenhoven, Mick Sullivan was the finest winger of his generation. He loved nothing better than a stroll around Taylor Park in his later years, where he spent many happy times during his childhood. Austin was also a classically-trained pianist in his youth too!He met his wife Marlene, from Alfred Street after being introduced by a mutual friend and they married at Holy Cross Church on 25th July 1963. Brian McGinn was Best Man. They have two children – Karen [who lives in Perth, Australia] and Martyn – and have always remained a strong family, especially proud of Austin’s achievements in rugby league.Everyone at St Helens RFC send their regards at this sad time.last_img read more

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first_imgLELAND, NC (WWAY) — Brunswick County Sheriff deputies are searching for two men who they say are wanted for shooting into a occupied vehicle Friday afternoon.Detectives say Dontee Forte and another man going by the name of “Sosa” were seen in the area of Four Seasons Mobile Home Park on Dogwood Road in Leland around 12:30 p.m.- Advertisement – Officials say the shooting happened after a domestic incident. No one was injured.Anyone with information should contact Det. McCaffity at ‭(910) 363-6555‬ or call 911.last_img

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first_imgNEW HANOVER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) – Some New Hanover County students will attend school 20 minutes longer, under a proposal to make-up some of the instructional time missed during Hurricane Florence.Students on the traditional calendar would have ten minutes added at both the beginning and end of the school day.- Advertisement – Four half days will become full days and students will attend school on February 21 and April 22, which are currently vacation days.For students attending year-round school, three half days will become full days and they will also attend school on April 22.Students on the Restart year-round calendar would also lose two vacation days and 5 intersession days: 12/19, 12/20, 4/1, 4/2, and 4/3.Related Article: New Hanover Co. Schools cancel classes on day of teacher rallyWilmington Early College High School would add back two teacher work days on October 12 and December 19.Isaac Bear Early College High School would add back one teacher workday on 10/12. SEA-Tech would add back three teacher workdays on 12/17, 12/18 and 12/19 and add back a 1/2 vacation day on 12/20 that would be early release for students.Finally, Lake Forest Academy would add a full day on 10/26 and add back three teacher workdays on 12/17-12/19.These are all proposals. The school board will approve the final calendar at the November school board meeting. A schools spokeswoman says more tweaks could be made before then.last_img read more

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first_imgHOLLY RIDGE, NC (WWAY/WNCT) — Officials are investigating a plane crash that left one person injured in Onslow County Monday afternoon.The crash happened on 140 Stump Sound Church Road in the airfield near the Holly Ridge-Topsail Island Airport around 3:30 p.m.- Advertisement – The North Carolina State Highway Patrol is handling the investigation and the Onslow County Sheriff’s Office investigators are heading to the scene.According to officials, at least one person was injured. The extent of the injuries is not known at this time.It’s unknown if anyone else was on the plane at the time of the crash.Related Article: Bike ride for breast cancer raises $91K for local patients, survivorsCheck back for more on this developing story.last_img

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first_imgWILMINGTON, NC (WWAY)– Friday WWAY’s Amanda Fitzpatrick got to read to “Llama Llama Red Pajama” to Ms. Zamorski’s pre-kindergarten class at Wrightsboro Elementary School in New Hanover County.You can watch the video above.last_img

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first_imgCar window lockedCar window locked The Police helped in saving a two year old boy from a locked car in Rabat early this morning.A spokesperson for the Police confirmed with Newsbook.com.mt that at around 7:45am, the Rapid Intervention Unit (RIU) was called to aid in the incident at Triq Musat Azzopardi in Rabat. The reason the child was locked inside has not been yet confirmed.The RIU used Res-Q-Me equipment which allows officers to break windows and glass of locked houses and cars. In extreme cases such as this one, this equipment could help save a life.Read: “I cried through everything but I did it”WhatsApp SharePrint <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>last_img read more

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first_img SharePrint <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=a7617b59&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=128&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=a7617b59&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> Alex Buttigieg / Motorsports Events PhotographyAlex Buttigieg / Motorsports Events Photography More than 80 drag racing cars, motorcycles and dragsters competed in the second round of the Enemed National Drag Racing Championship organised by the Malta Drag Racing Association at their raceway in Ħal Far between Friday 3rd and Sunday 5th May.Most drivers who did not have accidents or damage to their vehicles improved their personal best time.Among the many success stories, Chantelle Zammit did a 10.82-second run in her Escort MK1 Pinto powered car prepared by Mark Farrugia. Farrugia Renald on his Mitsubishi FTO broke a world record at 8.422 seconds at speeds of 177.33 miles per hour, a record for a Mitsubishi FTO without wheelie bar.Matthew Carabott, a driver of Mr Whippy Racing team ran the quarter-mile strip in 5.84 seconds at a speed of 234 miles per hour. This round also served as training for the Mr Whippy racing team, as at the end of the month they will debut at Santa Pod Raceway in London.The Bracket classes were won by Mario Camenzuli, Semira Galea, Lesley Portelli, Michael Caruana, Emilio Vassallo, Godfrey Mallia, Clinton Degiorgio, Glenn Caruana, Marvic Galea, Jesmond Mallia and Paul Ciantar. Index Classes have been won by Clive Zammit, Michael Caruana and Semira Galea.The Motorcycle SS1 class and Open Class were won by Luke Farrugia and Briegel Micallef respectively. Open Class 1, 2 and 3 were won by Paul Fenech, George Zarb and Patrick Scerri. D4 and D5 classes were won by Reuben Scicluna and Antoine Schembri. Open Front Wheel Drive and Front Wheel Drive Outlaw were won by Marvic Galea and Farrugia Renald. Garry Camilleri won the Extreme 2 Class. Louis Vella won the Open 6 Class while Christian Pace won Escort Class 2 and Escort Class 3.The next round – the 3rd round of the Enemed National Drag Racing Championship – will be held on the nights of the 11th, 12th and 13th July, at the Ħal Far Raceway.WhatsApplast_img read more

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